British Golf Rules in 1940


You have to hand it to the Brits when it comes to golf. And, you thought you were a tough weather golfer…

This is a notice posted in war-torn Britain in 1940 for golfers with stiff upper lips.

You have to admit — these guys really had guts!

German aircraft’s from Norway would fly on missions to northern England; because of the icy weather conditions, the barrels of their guns had a small dab of wax to protect them. As they crossed the coast, they would clear their guns by firing a few rounds at the golf courses. Golfers were urged to take cover.

(Attached is the original copy of the rules, but they are little hard to read. If you scroll down we’ve typed them out for you!)


RICHMOND GOLF CLUB
TEMPORARY RULES. 1940

  1. Players are asked to collect Bomb and Shrapnel splinters to save these causing damage to the Mowing Machines.
  2. In competitions, during gunfire or while bombs are falling, players may take cover without penalty for ceasing play.
  3. The positions of known delayed action bombs are marked by red flags at a reasonably, but not guaranteed, safe distance therefrom.
  4. Shrapnel and/or bomb splinters on the Fairways, or in Bunkers within a club’s length of a ball, may be moved without penalty, and no penalty shall be incurred if a ball is thereby caused to move accidentally.
  5. A ball moved by enemy action may be replaced, or if lost or destroyed, a ball may be dropped not nearer the hole without penalty.
  6. A ball lying in a crater may be lifted and dropped not near the hole, preserving the line to the hole without penalty.
  7. A player whose stroke is affected by the simultaneous explosion of a bomb may play another ball from the same place. Penalty one stroke.